Medical cannabis to be given to patients to study its clinical effect in UK

  07 November 2019    Read: 927
Medical cannabis to be given to patients to study its clinical effect in UK

Medical cannabis was legalised in the UK a year ago, but only a handful of patients have had access to the drug on the NHS.

Thousands of patients are to be given cannabis in the first large-scale study of the drug's clinical effect.

Medical cannabis, which is grown to a precise grade of active ingredient, was legalised in the UK a year ago.

But only a handful of patients have since been prescribed the drug on the NHS because of what medical authorities have called a "paucity of evidence" that it works and is safe.

The only option for patients is to either source cannabis illegally, and risk prosecution, or pay for a private prescription of the drug

The new study, called Project Twenty21, will subsidise cannabis for 20,000 patients to test its impact on seven conditions: chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, post-traumatic stress disorder, Tourette's syndrome, anxiety disorder and substance abuse.

Professor David Nutt of the organisation Drug Science, which is running the study, told Sky News: "I believe cannabis is going to be the most important innovation in medicine for the rest of my life.

"Cannabis medicines can be life-saving in disorders like severe childhood epilepsy.


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