Rare find at King Solomon's mines: Ancient pregnant woman's remains

  07 November 2017    Read: 604
Rare find at King Solomon's mines: Ancient pregnant woman's remains

The skeleton of a pregnant woman, dating back around 3,200 years, has been found near a temple dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Hathor at a place that was once called King Solomon's Mines, archaeologists recently announced, Fox reports.

Located in the Timna Valley in Israel, ancient Egyptians and others in the region used the mines for copper mining. Early archaeologists and explorers believed that King Solomon, an ancient Israeli ruler, controlled the Timna mines. However, many scholars now think the claim is unlikely.

Archaeologists discovered the pregnant woman's skeleton buried in a tumulus (a tomb covered by rocks) near Hathor's temple.

The people worshipped Hathor — the goddess of love, pleasure and maternity — at Timna, and considered her to be the protector of the miners.

At the time the pregnant woman lived, Egypt controlled the mines at Timna, suggesting she was Egyptian. In addition, she may have been a singer at the Hathor temple, said Erez Ben-Yosef, the director of the Central Timna Valley Project and a senior lecturer in archaeology at Tel Aviv University. She was buried with beads whose design is similar to those found at the Hathor temple, Ben-Yosef told Live Science.

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