Mexico’s highest court declares marijuana prohibition unconstitutional

  03 November 2018    Read: 887
Mexico’s highest court declares marijuana prohibition unconstitutional

The ban on marijuana use in Mexico has been declared unconstitutional by the supreme court, raising hopes that one day the drug might be legalized and available for commercial sale.

The historic ruling ruling was handed down on Wednesday in two individual cases concerning personal use of marijuana. It brings the number of similar rulings to five, with the highest court now ordering that Mexico’s Federal Commission for the Protection against Sanitary Risk enable people to take the drug.

The ruling found that “adults have a fundamental right to personal development which lets them decide their recreational activities without interference from the state,” according to the Associated Press.

"That right is not absolute, and the consumption of certain substances may be regulated, but the effects provoked by marijuana do not justify an absolute prohibition of its consumption," the supreme court added, according to reports.

Canadians had barely enjoyed legal marijuana for even a fortnight when they received high-level advice against using it, from the unlikeliest of people: the prime minister of the Netherlands.

The development has been hailed as a “historic day” by marijuana advocates in Mexico, such as Fernando Belaunzaran of the Party of Democratic Revolution (PRD).

Despite the verdict, the current law prohibiting marijuana use remains in place and will continue to do so until the Mexican congress decides to regulate the drug.

Last month Canada became the latest country to embrace marijuana by offering citizens the chance to buy the high from designated vendors. The demand has so far outweighed the supply, with provinces such as Alberta admitting they may need to find more ways to boost the current crop of marijuana.

 

RT


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